Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR)

Rauvolfia vomitoria
(Apocynaceae)

  
image of Rauvolfia vomitoria
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Species description or overview Taxonomy & nomenclature Status in native habitat Risk assessments Control methods Videos
Images Distribution Cited as invasive (on a list) In the news Other resources  

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Species description or overview

Rauvolfia vomitoria Afzelius: poison devil's-pepper
Limited information and images of devil's pepper are provided by the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service Plants Profile.

Rauvolfia vomitoria information from PIER
Information on Rauvolfia vomitoria as relevant to Pacific Islands is provided by the Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk project (PIER).

Rauvolfia vomitoria information from NTBG
Information about Rauvolfia vomitoria is available from the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG).


Taxonomy & nomenclature

GRIN nomenclature info for Rauvolfia vomitoria
Nomenclatural information about Rauvolfia vomitoria is provided by USDA/ARS/NGRP/GRIN.

Rauvolfia vomitoria information from ITIS
The Integrated Taxonomic Information System ITIS provides authoritative taxonomic information on Rauvolfia vomitoria, as well as other plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

IPNI nomenclature info for Rauvolfia vomitoria
Nomenclatural information about Rauvolfia vomitoria is provided by The International Plant Names Index (IPNI).


Status in native habitat

Regeneration of Rauwolfia vomitoria View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
Rauwolfia vomitoria is a fast disappearing medicinal plant in Nigeria. This study indicates vegetative propagation is an effective method for regeneration (African Journal of Biotechnology, 2007) .


Risk assessments

Rauvolfia vomitoria weed risk assessment for Hawaii-Pacific
Results of a weed risk assessment for Rauvolfia vomitoria for the Hawaii-Pacific region are presented by the Hawaii-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment team.


Control methods

A case study in rapid response: Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
Herbicide field trials to control a Rauvolfia vomitoria infestation on Hawaii Island are documented in videos from James Leary, University of Hawaii (2010).

Utilizing "Wet Blade" to control "Rauvolfia vomitoria"
The "Wet Blade" chemical delivery system using herbicides glyphosate, triclopyr, aminopyralid, and imazapyr against Rauvolfia vomitoria in Hawaii is evaluated in a video from James Leary, University of Hawaii (2010).

Kiai Moku: New technology pivotal amid fight against invasive weeds
The "Wet Blade" mowing technology and "Herbicide Ballistic Technology" using herbicide filled projectiles fired by paint guns are new weapons against invasive weeds (Maui News, 2/14/2010).

A case study in rapid response: Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
The problem of invasive Rauvolfia vomitoria on Hawaii Island and herbicide control methods (broadcast application/spraying, frill and squirt) using triclopyr, imazapyr, and glyphosphate are reviewed in a YouTube video from the University of Hawaii (2/11/2009).

Utilizing "Wet Blade" to control Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
Imazapyr was best controlling both Rauvolfia vomitoria and guava after five months using the "Wet Blade" chemical delivery system to compare herbicides (YouTube video posted by James Leary of the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, 11/24/2009).

Rauvolfia vomitoria 100 days after treatment (video)
Herbicide field trials to control a Rauvolfia vomitoria infestation on Hawaii Island reveal pros and cons of each treatment (broadcast application/spraying, frill and squirt) using triclopyr, imazapyr, and glyphosphate (Dr. James Leary, University of Hawaii Invasive Weed Specialist, YouTube, 2/11/2009).


Videos

A case study in rapid response: Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
Herbicide field trials to control a Rauvolfia vomitoria infestation on Hawaii Island are documented in videos from James Leary, University of Hawaii (2010).

Utilizing "Wet Blade" to control "Rauvolfia vomitoria"
The "Wet Blade" chemical delivery system using herbicides glyphosate, triclopyr, aminopyralid, and imazapyr against Rauvolfia vomitoria in Hawaii is evaluated in a video from James Leary, University of Hawaii (2010).

A case study in rapid response: Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
The problem of invasive Rauvolfia vomitoria on Hawaii Island and herbicide control methods (broadcast application/spraying, frill and squirt) using triclopyr, imazapyr, and glyphosphate are reviewed in a YouTube video from the University of Hawaii (2/11/2009).

Utilizing "Wet Blade" to control Rauvolfia vomitoria (video)
Imazapyr was best controlling both Rauvolfia vomitoria and guava after five months using the "Wet Blade" chemical delivery system to compare herbicides (YouTube video posted by James Leary of the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, 11/24/2009).

Rauvolfia vomitoria 100 days after treatment (video)
Herbicide field trials to control a Rauvolfia vomitoria infestation on Hawaii Island reveal pros and cons of each treatment (broadcast application/spraying, frill and squirt) using triclopyr, imazapyr, and glyphosphate (Dr. James Leary, University of Hawaii Invasive Weed Specialist, YouTube, 2/11/2009).


Images

Rauvolfia vomitoria images from HEAR
High-quality images of Rauvolfia vomitoria are provided by the Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR).

Rauvolfia vomitoria images
High resolution images of Rauvolfia vomitoria are from the Pacific Environmental Image Gallery (HEAR/PBIN).

Rauvolfia vomitoria images from PIER
Images of Rauvolfia vomitoria provided by the Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk project (PIER).


Distribution

Rauvolfia vomitoria Afzelius: poison devil's-pepper
Limited information and images of devil's pepper are provided by the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service Plants Profile.


Cited as invasive (on a list)

List of invasive and noxious weeds with scientific name =R
The USDA National Resources Conservation Services lists invasive and noxious weeds in its PLANTS database.


In the news

Kiai Moku: Rauvolfia vomitoria a growing problem
Poison devil's pepper is over-harvested in it's native west Africa, but is an aggressive pest in Hawaii (Maui News, 11/14/2010).

Kiai Moku: New technology pivotal amid fight against invasive weeds
The "Wet Blade" mowing technology and "Herbicide Ballistic Technology" using herbicide filled projectiles fired by paint guns are new weapons against invasive weeds (Maui News, 2/14/2010).


Other resources

Approval of expenditure of funds and authoriation to negotiate and sign contracts to implement the Watership Partnership ARRA projects View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources lists projects for control of invasive species in Hawaii watershed areas funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (9/15/09).


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The Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk (HEAR) project was historically funded by the Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) through PIERC (USGS) with support from HCSU (UH Hilo). More details are available online. Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII)

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