Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Cotoneaster pannosus
Franch., Rosaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  yes

Risk assessment results: 

Evaluate, score: 5 (Go to the risk assessment (Australia))
High risk, score: 7 (Go to the risk assessment (Pacific))

Common name(s): [more details]

Chinese: zhan mao xun zi

English: silver-leaf cotoneaster

Habit:  shrub

Description:  "Shrubs semievergreen, to 2 m tall. Branchlets dark grayish brown or purplish brown, thin, initially densely white tomentose, glabrescent. Petiole 2-7 mm, tomentose; stipules caducous, linear, pubescent; leaf blade narrowly elliptic, elliptic, or ovate, 2-3 (-4) x 0.8-1.5 cm, leathery, midvein impressed adaxially, lateral veins 4-6 pairs, abaxially densely white tomentose, adaxially slightly pubescent or glabrous, base broadly cuneate, apex obtuse or acute. Corymbs 1-3 x 1.5-2.5 cm, to 10 (-20)-flowered; rachis and pedicels densely tomentose; bracts caducous, linear, pubescent. Pedicel 2-3 mm. Flowers 7-8 mm in diameter. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially densely tomentose. Sepals triangular, apex shortly acuminate or acute. Petals spreading, white, broadly ovate or suborbicular, 3-3.5 mm, base shortly clawed and puberulous adaxially, apex obtuse. Stamens 20, nearly as long as petals; anthers purplish red. Ovary pubescent apically; styles 2(or 3), free, ca. as long as stamens. Fruit dark red, globose or ovoid, 7-8 mm in diameter, pyrenes often 2"  (Flora of China online).

"[S]hrub up to 2 m tall with simple, elliptic leaves 1-2.5 cm long, flowers in dense corymbs, carpels 2-5, and fruit a globose to ellipsoid, dull red pome ca. 6 mm long"  (Wagner et al., 1999; pp. 1100, 1859).

Habitat/ecology:  "Grassland, coastal beaches and scrub.  The species thrives in poor and droughty soils and shades out native sun-loving plant species.  Eventually, large areas of native vegetation may become displaced by cotoneasters.  The shrub has a strong and deep root system and branches profusely at ground level"  (Weber, 2003; p. 123).

Moist and wet forest areas, roadsides, openings, at 3,000-6,500 ft. elevation in Hawai‘i.

Propagation:  Bird-dispersed fruit.

Native range:  China (Sichuan, Yunnan) (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Guam
Guam Island
Guam Island introduced
Fosberg, F. R./Sachet, Marie-Hélène/Oliver, Royce (1979) (p. 88)
Cultivated?
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Hawai‘i (Big) Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Wagner, Warren L./Herbst, Derral R./Sohmer, S. H. (1999) (p. 1100)
Occasional reproduction.
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Hawai‘i (Big) Island introduced
invasive
Parker, James L./Parsons, Bobby (2012) (p. 72)
Voucher cited: J. Parker & R. Parsons BIED127 (BISH)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Kaua‘i Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Lorence, David H./Flynn, Timothy W./Wagner, Warren L. (1995) (p. 49)
Vouchers cited: K.R. Wood & S. Perlman 2878 (PTBG), Lorence & Flynn 7603 (PTBG)
Naturalized in diverse mesic forest, 1000-1300 m elevation.
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Maui Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Herbarium Pacificum Staff (1999) (p. 8)
East Maui. Voucher cited: C. Imada, W. Char & C. Morden 98-10 (BISH)
New Caledonia
New Caledonia Archipelago
Île Grande Terre introduced
cultivated
MacKee, H. S. (1994) (p. 121)
Vouchers cited: MacKee 28343, MacKee 42846
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
Harley, Barbara (2009)
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
Naturalised
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Oregon) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)

Comments:  Would be a threat only at higher elevations in the tropics.

Other cotoneasters, with their bird-dispersed fruits, should be avoided as well.

Control: 

Physical: Pull young plants. Smother seedlings with mulch or black plastic.

Chemical: Cut branches back to stump and treat stump with 100 percent glyphosate herbicide.


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 1 JAN 1999 and was last updated on 23 AUG 2011.