Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Jasminum fluminense
Vell., Oleaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Risk assessment results:  High risk, score: 16 (Go to the risk assessment)

Common name(s): [more details]

English: Brazilian jasmine, Gold Coast jasmine, jasmine

French: jasmin à bouguet, jasmin blanc

Spanish: jasmín de canario, jasmiín de trapo, jasmín oloroso

Habit:  vine

Description:  "A pubescent climber with 3 leaflets, fragrant white flowers in broad loose cymes, and corolla 5-6-lobed with a tube 1.5-2.5 cm long" (Wagner et al., 1999; pp. 990, 1886)."Evergreen scrambling shrub or climbing to 12 m high; stems pubescent; leaflets broadly ovate, acute or acuminate, truncate-subcordate at base; cymes lateral and terminal; corolla 5-9-lobed, white; ovary with 1 ovule in each cell"  (Adams, 1972; p. 578).

Habitat/ecology:  "Brazilian jasmine occurs in Puerto Rico in areas that receive from about 750 to 1800 mm of annual rainfall. It grows from near sea level to more than 600 m in elevation. Soils of all textures and parent material are colonized. However, it does not tolerate poorly drained soils. The species is restricted to areas with minimum temperatures above 1.7 řC (Florida Exotic Plant Council 2001). It will grow on the coast in areas that do not receive salt spray (Florida Exotic Plant Council 2001). Brazilian jasmine will grow in partial shade and climb upward to better light. It can survive but is not aggressive in the denser shade of unbroken forest canopies. Most plants grow in natural and artificial openings in the forest such as fencerows, river banks, roadsides, brushy pastures, and logged or burnt-over forest"  (Wildland shrubs of the United States and its territories).  "Gold Coast and Brazilian jasmine are both capable of completely enshrouding native vegetation.  They can climb high into the canopy of mature forests, cutting off natural light and reducing the diversity of native species" (Randall & Marinelli, 1996; p. 149).  Lower elevation moist and dry sites in Hawai‘i.

Propagation:  Seed, often spread by birds. "In Florida, seed is spread by raccoons and birds" (Motooka et al., 2003).

Native range:  "The African and Middle Eastern native range of Brazilian jasmine includes Mauritius, the Seychelles, Arabia, Ethiopia, southern Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique, Angola, Nigeria, South Africa (Miami-Dade County 2001), the Azores, and the Canary Islands (Acevedo-RodrĄguez 1985). The species has naturalized and escaped throughout much of the tropics and subtropics"  (Wildland shrubs of the United States and its territories).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
French Polynesia
Society Islands
Moorea Island   Fosberg, F. R. (1997) (p. 84)
French Polynesia
Society Islands
Raiatea (Havai) Island cultivated
Welsh, S. L. (1998)
French Polynesia
Society Islands
Tahiti Island introduced
cultivated
Florence, J./Chevillotte, H./Ollier, C./Meyer, J.-Y. (2013)
Voucher cited: J. Florence 9271 (PAP)
Ornementale trés rare.
French Polynesia
Society Islands
Tahiti Island   Bishop Museum (Honolulu) (1988) (voucher ID: BISH 558263)
Taxon name on voucher: Jasminum fluminense Vell.
French Polynesia
Tuamotu Archipelago
Takapoto Atoll introduced
cultivated
Sachet, M-H. (1983) (p. 32)
Voucher cited: Sachet 2082 (US)
Guam
Guam Island
Guam Island introduced
Fosberg, F. R./Sachet, Marie-Hélène/Oliver, Royce (1979) (p. 208)
Guam
Guam Island
Guam Island   Bishop Museum (Honolulu) (1963) (voucher ID: BISH 661719)
Taxon name on voucher: Jasminum fluminense Vell.
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Hawai‘i (Big) Island introduced
invasive
Herbarium Pacificum Staff (1996) (p. 5)
Vouchers cited: D. Herbst & G. Spence 5634 (BISH), W.L. Wagner, C. Imada & W. Takeuchi 5938 (BISH)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Maui Island introduced
invasive
Starr, Forest/Martz, Kim/Loope, Lloyd L. (2002) (p. 22)
East Maui. Voucher cited: Starr & Martz 980403-30 (BISH)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
O‘ahu Island introduced
invasive
Herbarium Pacificum Staff (1996) (p. 5)
Vouchers cited: E. Funk s.n. (BISH), H. St. John 25517 (BISH), G. Linney 871017-43 (BISH)
Common, rapidly spreading.
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Costa Rica
Costa Rica
Costa Rica (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
El Salvador
El Salvador
El Salvador (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Honduras
Honduras
Honduras (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico (United Mexican States) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Tabasco
Naturalized
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Panama
Panama
Panama (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Indian Ocean
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Mauritius
Mautitius Islands (Mauritius and Rodrigues)
Mauritius Island native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Seychelles
Seychelles Islands
Seychelles Islands native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
USA (Florida) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized

Comments:  Naturalizing rapidly in Hawai‘i.

Planting of this species is prohibited in Miami-Dade County, Florida (U.S.) (Hunsberger, 2001).

Other species: J. dichotomum (gold coast jasmine) is an invasive species in the US. Other Jasminum species naturalized in the US include star jasmine (J. multiflorum), yellow jasmine (J. mesnyi), poet's jasmine (J. officinale) and shining jasmine (J. nitidum) (Randall & Marinelli, 1996; p. 149). J. humile (yellow jasmine) and J. polyanthum are invasive in New Zealand.

Control: 

Physical. Young plants can be hand pulled.

Chemical: Large, mature, woody vines can be cut at ground level and treated with a triclopyr herbicide mixed with 50 percent water. Follow-up treatments will probably be required (Randall & Marinelli, 1996; p. 149).  "Sensitive to triclopyr, 50% of product, in cut-stump treatment"  (Motooka et al., 2003).


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This page was created on 1 JAN 1999 and was last updated on 4 JUL 2012.