Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Eragrostis curvula
(Schrad.) Nees, Poaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Other Latin names:  Eragrostis chloromelas Steud.; Eragrostis subulata Nees

Common name(s): [more details]

Chinese: wan ye hua mei cao

English: African lovegrass, Boer love grass, weeping lovegrass

Spanish: pasto llorón

Habit:  grass

Description:  "Stiff, densely tufted perennials, to 70 cm; branching intravaginal, shoots ± thickened at base. Leaf-sheath coriaceous, strongly ribbed, light creamy brown at base, purplish above, with short, scattered, stiff hairs, lower sheaths tomentose near base. Ligule ciliate, hairs 0.8-1.4 mm. Collar hairs 2-5.5 mm. Leaf-blade 10-55 cm x 0.5-1.3 mm diameter., narrowly involute or convolute, abaxially glabrous, adaxially ribbed, ribs minutely scabrid; margins minutely scabrid, long-narrowed to filiform, acute, scabrid tip. Culm 20-80 cm, rarely branched above, erect, internodes glabrous. Panicle 12-22 cm, lax, at first narrow-sagittate, later more open; branches ascending to later spreading, solitary or binate, ± scabrid, branch-axils at lower nodes with hairs (to 4 mm). Spikelets 4.5-6-(8) mm, 4-6-(8)-flowered, ± smooth, not very compressed, linear-lanceolate, olive-grey. Glumes unequal, hyaline, 1-nerved, oblong-lanceolate, apex subacute, minutely scabrid; lower 1.6-2 mm, upper 2.2-2.8 mm. Lemma 2.5-2.8 mm, 3-(5)-nerved, membranous, elliptic-oblong, obtuse, hardly keeled, minutely scabrid. Palea ≈ lemma, keels sparsely scabrid, apex truncate, ciliate. Rachilla glabrous, 0.6-0.8 mm. Stamens 3; anthers 0.9-1.6 mm. Caryopsis 1.4-1.6 x 0.6-0.8 mm"  (Edgar & Connor, 2000; p. 528).

Description from GrassBase.

Habitat/ecology:  "Heath- and shrubland, grass- and woodland, seasonal freshwater wetlands.  Where native, this grass is found in moist sandy soils and in disturbed woodlands.  It is drought tolerant and very tolerant to soil salinity; germination can take place under high soil salinity levels.  It does not grow on wet, seepy soils and does not tolerate standing water.  The grass establishes easily and persists well under grazing.  Where invasive, it becomes dominant on low-fertility soils and the dense tussocks displace native vegetation"  (Weber, 2003; p. 154).

Propagation:  Seed, dispersed by water, wind and animals  (Weber, 2003; p. 154).

Native range:  Eastern and southern Africa; naturalized elsewhere (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Kaho‘olawe Island introduced
invasive
Herbst, Derral R./Clayton, W. D. (1998) (p. 26)
Vouchers cited: Aschermann s.n. (BISH 634250), Warren s.n. (BISH 634223)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Maui Island introduced
invasive
Oppenheimer, Hank L. (2003) (p. 20)
East Maui. Voucher cited: Oppenheimer H60109 (BISH)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
O‘ahu Island introduced
invasive
Herbst, Derral R./Clayton, W. D. (1998) (p. 26)
"Uncommon in abondoned sugarcane fields". Voucher cited: Nagata 4437 (BISH)
Japan (offshore islands)
Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands
Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands introduced
Kato, Hidetoshi (2007)
New Guinea (Indonesia and Papua New Guinea)
New Guinea Island
New Guinea Island introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island)
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island) introduced
cultivated
Henty, E. E. (1969) (p. 96)
Trial as a pasture grass.
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) introduced
invasive
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
South Australia, Tasmania, Western Australia
Naturalised
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
Naturalised
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland introduced
invasive
Queensland Herbarium (2002) (p. 3)
Chile (continental)
Chile
Chile (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
China
China
China (People's Republic of) introduced
cultivated
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
Commonly cultivated for ornament. Fujian, Guangxi, Hubei, Jiangsu, Xinjiang, Yunnan.
China
China
Hong Kong native
Wu, Te-lin (2001) (p. 334)
Colombia
Colombia
Colombia (Republic of)   Holm, Leroy/Pancho, Juan V./Herberger, James P./Plucknett, Donald L. (1979) (p. 144)
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico (United Mexican States) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
Edgar, E./Connor, H. (2000) (p. 528)
"Roadsides, in sandy soil, or on banks, depleted tussock grassland, stony flats and waste land. Some records are of escapes from experimental plots".
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Oregon) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Washington) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)

Control:  For additional control information see the information sheet from Weedbusters New Zealand.

Physical:  "Smaller plants can be dug out, the crowns must be removed to prevent regrowth.  Burning before flowering starts is used to remove topgrowth.  Re-establishment of desirable overstorey species can shade out the grass".

Chemical:  "Regrowth and seedlings are sprayed with grass-selective herbicides"  (Weber, 2003; p. 154).


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This page was created on 11 FEB 2007 and was last updated on 25 APR 2013.