Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Araujia sericifera
Brotero, Apocynaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  no

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Risk assessment results:  High risk, score: 24 (Go to the risk assessment)

Other Latin names:  Araujia hortorum E.Fourn.; Physianthus albens Mart.

Common name(s): [more details]

English: bladder flower, Cape-dandelion, cruelplant, moth catcher, moth plant, mothvine, Peruvian-creeper, white bladder flower, white mothplant, white mothvine

Habit:  vine

Description:  "Stems twining, less than 12 m, soft-tomentose when young.  Leaf: opposite, petiole less than 1 cm; blade 5-12 cm, upper surface glabrous, lower generally densely puberulent.  Inflorescence raceme- or panicle-like.  Flowers: sepals large, leaf-like, more or less erect; corolla more or less erect; corolla more or less erect (greater than stamens, pistils), 2-3 cm, bell- or funnel-shaped, white; pistil head with 2 erect, elongate lobes.  Fruit pendent, generally ovoid, with coarse longitudinal grooves,10-12 cm"  (Hickman, 1993; p. 171).

Habitat/ecology:  Disturbed areas. Smothers existing vegetation and can form huge patches and colonies.

"In Australia, the plant is widespread throughout the eastern States, particularly from south-east Queensland south along the coast of new South Wales, where it tends to be associated with rainforest remnants, vine scrubs and wet sclerophyll forests.  It has a limited distribution in Victoria, where it has invaded riparian vegetation and damp sclerophyll forest."  (Csurhes and Edwards, 1998; p. 142).  In New Zealand, "intact and disturbed forest and margins, tracks, coastline, cliffs, shrublands, mangroves, inshore and offshore islands; almost any frost-free habitat. Rapid growth to canopy, overtops other vines, forming large, heavy, long-lived masses. Produces masses of viable seeds that can drift on air currents and spread long distances. Tolerant of shade, event as a seedling, very tolerant of drought or damp, wind, salt, many soil types, and damage, but is frost tender. Poisonous and irritant-inducing (not grazed). Germinates in light wells or semi-shade inside established forest, often long distance from seed source, and smothers and kills plants up into the canopy, preventing the establishment of native plant species. May kill native insect species"  (Weedbusters New Zealand).

Propagation:  Wind-dispersed seed.  Produces large amounts of seed.

Native range:  Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay; also cultivated and naturalized (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Australian Capitol Territory, South Australia
Naturalized
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
Csurhes, S./Edwards, R. (1998) (p. 142)
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland introduced
invasive
Csurhes, S./Edwards, R. (1998) (p. 142)
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
cultivated
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 148)
"Around gardens, in waste places, plantations and other modified habitats".
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
South Africa
South Africa
South Africa (Republic of) introduced
invasive
Csurhes, S./Edwards, R. (1998) (p. 142)
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Arizona, Georgia
Naturalized

Comments:  A noxious weed in California. Reported to be invasive in Israel.

Control:  (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Physical: "Poisonous and causes dermatitis; protect skin against contact with sap. Destroy ripe pods first to minimise seeding and seed contamination of clothing"  (Weedbusters New Zealand).

Chemical: Escort. Rate - Knapsack 5 g Escort + 10 mls Pulse/10 litres water. Use the cut stem approach for small infestations. Spray large infestations with Escort. Be aware of herbicide impact on host plants. Follow up will be required.

"1. Stump swab (best in summer- autumn): Tordon Brushkiller (100ml/L) or Banvine (200ml/L) or Yates Woody Weedkiller (400ml/L). Remove all pods and dispose of at refuse transfer station, burn or bury deeply. Leave remaining cut material on site to rot down. 2. Spray (summer-autumn): Tordon Brushkiller (30ml/10L) or Banvine (12ml/L) or Yates Woody Weedkiller (24ml/L)"  (Weedbusters New Zealand).

Additional information:
Additional online information about Araujia sericifera is available from the Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR).

Information about Araujia sericifera as a weed (worldwide references) may be available from the Global Compendium of Weeds (GCW).

Taxonomic information about Araujia sericifera may be available from the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).

Information sheet from Weedbusters New Zealand about Araujia sericifera

Fact sheet, including control information, from the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, New Zealand

Fact sheet from the Government of Queensland, Australia about Araujia sericifera

References:

Australian National Botanic Gardens. 2013. Australian plant common name database. Online resource.

Csurhes, S./Edwards, R. 1998. Potential environmental weeds in Australia: Candidate species for preventative control. Canberra, Australia. Biodiversity Group, Environment Australia. 208 pp.

Hickman, J. C. 1993. The Jepson manual: higher plants of California. U. Cal. Press, Berkeley. 1400 pp.

Owen, S. J. 1997. Ecological weeds on conservation land in New Zealand: A database. Working draft. Wellington, New Zealand. Department of Conservation.

U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. 2013. National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Online searchable database.

Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. 1988. Flora of New Zealand, Volume IV: Naturalised pteridophytes, gymnosperms, dicotyledons. Botany Division, DSIR, Christchurch. 1365 pp.


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 1 JAN 1999 and was last updated on 24 FEB 2013.