Western Australia Department of Agriculture (AgWest) Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR) Global Compendium of Weeds (GCW) Global Compendium of Weeds
Sporobolus africanus (Poaceae)


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Presented here is summary information about the species Sporobolus africanus from the Global Compendium of Weeds, and citations of references to this species as a weed. Definitions of terms are available in the GCW introduction View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format. For further information--or to report corrections or concerns--contact webmaster@hear.org.


Synonyms/other Latin names:see GRIN ]

Status(es) (compiled for below "Data sources"): agricultural weed, casual alien, environmental weed, naturalised, noxious weed, weed [for definitions, see the GCW introduction View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format.]

Origin (native to where): [no info]



Data sources:

Auld, B.A. and Medd, R.W. (1992) WEEDS, An illustrated botanical guide to the weeds of Australia. Inkata Press, Melbourne. (weed)

Barker, W.R., R.M.Barker, J.P. Jessop & H.P. Vonow (Eds.) (2005). Census of South Australian Vascular Plants. 5th Edition. J. Adelaide Bot. Gard. Supplement 1. (Botanic Gardens of Adelaide & State Herbarium: Adelaide). (naturalised)

Batianoff, G.N. and Butler, D.W. (2002). Assessment of Invasive naturalized plants in south-east Queensland. Appendix. 1 Plant Protection Quarterly 17, 27-34. (environmental weed, naturalised)

Blood, K. (2001) Environmental weeds: A field guide for SE Australia. C.H. Jerram & Associates. (environmental weed)

Bromilow, C. (1995) Problem Plants of South Africa. Briza Publications, Arcardia, South Africa. (weed)

Chris Buddenhagen and Melanie Newfield (pers comm. 2001) A list of potential and actual environmental weeds for New Zealand. Department of Conservation. (environmental weed)

turalized throughout much of Nigeria and occasionally cultivated for its fruit. It has been infrequently planted in southern Florida, mainly as a curiosity. The tree is tropical, ranging from sea-level to 5,500 or 6,000 ft (1,700-1,800 m) in Mexico and Central America; to 2,500 ft (760 m) in Jamaica, in either dry or humid regions. It flowers but does not fruit in Israel; is cold-sensitive in Florida.  It is grown very easily and quickly by setting large cuttings upright in the ground. It is one of the trees most used to create "living fences". It grows very slowly from seed.  There are flowers and fruits of the red form nearly all year in Jamaica, but mainly in July and August, while the yellow variant fruits only from September to November. In the Bahamas, the fruiting season of the red type is brief, just May and June; the yellow ripens from August to early October. In Mexico, the fruits are regarded as diuretic and antispasmodic. The fruit decoction is used to bathe wounds and heal sores in the mouth. A sirup prepared from the fruit is taken to overcome chronic diarrhea. The astringent bark decoction is a remedy for mange, ulcers, dysentery and for bloating caused by intestinal gas in infants. In the Philippines, the sap of the bark is used to treat stomatitis in infants.  The juice of the fresh leaves is a remedy for thrush. A decoction of the leaves and bark is employed as a febrifuge. In southwestern Nigeria, an infusion of shredded leaves is valued for washing cuts, sores and burns. Researchers at the University of Ife have found that an aqueous extract of the leaves has antibacterial action, and an alcoholic extract is even more effective. The gum-resin of the tree is blended with pineapple or soursop juice for treating jaundice. Most of the other uses indicate that the fruits, leaves and bark are fairly rich in tannin. (naturalised)

A Draft list of Species Reported Alien to the Caribbean. This table presents provisional information on the distribution of species reported alien in the Caribbean. The list is drawn from a work in progress database that aims to collate more detailed information on the occurrence and impact of all species known to occur as aliens in the region. The species listed are those reported to be established in the wild in marine; freshwater or terrestrial habitats. Some of the species on the list are regarded as invasive (spreading) in at least one Caribbean territory. As a working document; it is anticipated that this list will contain some omissions and errors. In particular; it is expected that the distributions of many species will be incomplete. The intention therefore is to provide a list for discussion; aiding workshop participants to contribute to and; where necessary; correct information on the occurrence and impact of alien species in the region. CABIBioscience (naturalised)

Faith T. Campbell; American Lands Alliance; weeds (environmental weed)

Germplasm ResourcesWildlife Atlas CAPS plant taxa - Census of Plants in New South Wales National Parks? New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service. (weed)




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This page was created on 13 September 2007 by PT, and was last updated on 04 October 2007 by PT based on data from Rod Randall's Global Compendium of Weeds database dated 24 January 2007. Valid HTML 4.01!