Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Rubus adenotrichos
Schltdl., Rosaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Common name(s): [more details]

Spanish: mora, mora de Castilla, mora silvestre, zarzamora

Habit:  shrub

Description:  "Scandent shrub or vine. Stems angled, pilose or villous, with long-stipitate glands (stipes 1-5 mm long, longer than the hairs), prickly, prickles gradually narrowed from a broad base, 4-6 mm long, slightly curved. Stipules subulate, 5-22 x 0.5-2 mm, chartaceous, pilose with subsessile glands. Petioles 30-80 (-160) mm long, densely pilose with long-stipitate glands. Leaves 5-foliolate; leaflets ovate or oblong, 5-15 x 3-10 cm, subcoriaceous, with 10-16 pairs of secondary veins, base rounded, apex acuminate, margin serrate or serrulate, lower surface pilose or villous on veins, with sessile and subsessile glands, upper surface glabrous or sparsely pilose or villous, with few sessile and subsessile glands. Flowering branches often with 3-foliolate and smaller leaves. Inflorescences pyramidal, lax panicles, 17-40 cm long, with 20-100 flowers, with usually cymose branches; pedicles 8-20 mm long, sparsely pilose or villous, with stipitate glands, unarmed. Flowers 15-20 mm diameter; sepals ovate, 5-10 x 3.-5 mm, apex acuminate, abaxially villous or greenish-pilose, with few stipitate and subsessile glands, occasionally sericeous, adaxially pannose; petals spathulate to suborbicular, 8-12 x 5-10 mm, white or pale pink; carpels glabrous or barbate. Fruits globose to ovoid, 12-20 x 10-15 mm, with ascending sepals; drupelets 3-5 x 2-3 mm, 45-60 per receptacle, glabrous, reddish purple to black. Rubus adenotrichos is characterized by its long-stipitate glands, pyramidal many-flowered inflorescences, and fruits with numerous drupelets" (Harling & Andersson, 1996; pp. 39, 41).

Habitat/ecology:  In the Galápagos Islands, forms dense patches that displace other plants (Soria et al., 2002; pp. 49-50). In Ecuador, "from 1200 to 3600 m, in pastures and along roadsides" (Harling & Andersson, 1996; pp. 39, 41).

Propagation:  Seed, probably dispersed by fruit-eating birds (Soria et al., 2002; pp. 49-50).

Native range:  Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Venezuela (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Ecuador (Galápagos Islands)
Isabela Group
Isabela Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Charles Darwin Foundation (2008)
Ecuador (Galápagos Islands)
Isabela Group
Volcán Sierra Negra, Isabela Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Charles Darwin Foundation (2008)
Ecuador (Galápagos Islands)
Santa Cruz Group
Santa Cruz Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Charles Darwin Foundation (2008)
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Costa Rica
Costa Rica
Costa Rica (Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Ecuador (Mainland)
Ecuador
Ecuador (Republic of) (continental) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Guatemala
Guatemala
Guatemala (Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Honduras
Honduras
Honduras (Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico (United Mexican States) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)

Comments:  Subject of an eradication program in the Galápagos Islands (Chris Buddenhagen, pers. com.)

Control:  See other Rubus species for control suggestions.


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This page was created on 17 JAN 2004 and was last updated on 18 DEC 2012.