Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Malva nicaeensis
All., Malvaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  yes

Other Latin names:  Malva arvensis J. Presl & C. Presl

Common name(s): [more details]

English: bull mallow, French mallow, malva of Nice

Spanish: malva, malva silvestre

Habit:  herb

Description:  "Annual or short-lived perennial, procumbent, ascending or erect herb. Stems sparsely to moderately hairy with usually simple hairs. Leaves glabrous to sparsely hairy with usually simple hairs and rarely stellate hairs above, sparsely to moderately hairy below, reniform to orbicular, obtuse to cordate at base, shallowly or moderately 5-7-palmately lobed and crenate, 1-10-(15) cm in diameter; petioles 1-20-(30) cm long; stipules broadly ovate with acute apex, 2-8 mm long. Flowers in axillary clusters of (1)-2-6; fruiting pedicels 2-10-(15) mm long; epicalyx segments narrowly ovate-oblong to broadly ovate, ± = calyx at flowering; calyx teeth broadly ovate-triangular, sparsely hairy with simple or stellate hairs and ciliate on teeth but lower tube ± glabrous, slightly enlarged at fruiting; petals pale lilac or pink with darker veins and tips, about 2x length of calyx, 6-10 mm long. Mericarps 8-9-(10) per fruit, often hairy when immature but usually becoming glabrous, strongly reticulately veined on back; edges sharply angled but not winged"  (Webb et al., 1988; p. 833).

Habitat/ecology:  In New Zealand, "waste places, coastal habitats"  (Webb et al., 1988; p. 833).  "In Chile this species grows in the following environmental conditions:  Low altitude, interior valleys; coastal mountains, 500-2000 m; coastal areas, 0-500 m. Dry, arid areas, with long drought periods of 6-10 months, precipitations of 100-300 mm. are concentrated in winter; somewhat dry areas where the drought may last 3-5 months, precipitations of 400-800 mm. are concentrated in winter. Fully exposed to the sun, level areas or slopes facing north; some shadow, some protection against direct sunlight, some shadow from vegetation, filtering about 20-40% of light"  (Chileflora).

Propagation:  Seed

Native range:  Canary and Madeira Islands, northern Africa, Europe, western Asia; naturalized elsewhere (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más a Tierra (Robinson Crusoe Island) introduced
invasive
Atkinson, Rachel/Sawyer, John (2011)
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más a Tierra (Robinson Crusoe Island) introduced
invasive
cultivated
Danton, Philippe/Perrier, Christophe/Martinez Reyes, Guido (2006) (p. 555)
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
Chile (continental)
Chile
Chile (Republic of) introduced
Belov, Michail (2013)
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 833)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
Montana


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 11 FEB 2011 and was last updated on 20 MAY 2013.