Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

  [   PIER species lists  ]   [   PIER home  ]

Lespedeza cuneata
(Dum. Cours.) G. Don, Fabaceae
Click on an image for links to BIGGER PICTURES


Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  yes

Risk assessment results:  High risk, score: 17 (Go to the risk assessment)

Other Latin names:  Lespedeza juncea var. sericea Maxim.; Lespedeza sericea Miq.

Common name(s): [more details]

Chinese: jie ye tie sao zhou

English: Chinese bush-clover, Chinese lespedeza, perennial lespedeza, sericea lespedeza, silky bush-clover

French: lespédéza soyeux

Korean: bisuri

Spanish: lespedeza perenne

Habit:  herb

Description:  "Subshrubs 6-9 dm tall; stems many-branched, densely pubescent.  Leaves closely spaced, leaflets grayish green, obovate or narrowly obovate, 5-20 mm long, 1-15 mm wide, upper surface glabrous, lower surface densely pubescent, apex emarginate, sometimes abruptly truncate.  Flowers subsessile, up to 7 mm long, (1) 2-4 per cluster; calyx 3.5-5 mm long, densely pubescent, persistent in fruit; corolla pale yellow tinged red, in some flowers absent along with stamens, standard with violet red blotches at base, 5-6.5 mm long.  Pods not stipitate, 2.5-4 mm long and slightly narrower, apiculate, with reticulate ridges.  Seed 1, pale brown, reniform, ca. 1.5 mm long, ca. 1 mm in diameter"  (Wagner et al., 1999; p. 679).

Habitat/ecology:  In Hawai‘i, "apparently sparingly naturalized" (Wagner et al., 1999; p. 679).  In Fiji, "sparingly cultivated near sea level.  Probably Fiji does not offer a suitable climate for this temperate species, which in New Guinea occurs only in highland areas"  (Smith, 1985; p. 201).

Propagation:  Seed

Native range:  "Widespread from India, China, and Japan throughout Malesia to northern Australia" (Wagner et al., 1999; p. 679).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Fiji
Fiji Islands
Viti Levu Island introduced
cultivated
Smith, Albert C. (1985) (p. 201)
Vouchers cited: DA 4050, DA 4051
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
O‘ahu Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Wagner, Warren L./Herbst, Derral R./Sohmer, S. H. (1999)
Voucher cited: Hosaka 2528 (BISH)
Apparently sparingly naturalized.
Japan (offshore islands)
Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands
Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands introduced
Kato, Hidetoshi (2007)
Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island)
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Philippines
Philippine Islands
Philippine Islands native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Philippines
Philippine Islands
Philippine Islands   Merrill, Elmer D. (1923) (p. 294)
On open grassy slopes, altitude 1,200 to 2,200 m.
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland native
Smith, Albert C. (1985) (p. 201)
China
China
China (People's Republic of) native
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
Mountain slopes, roadsides; below 2500 m. Fujian?, Gansu, Guangdong, Guizhou?, Hainan?, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu?, Shaan-xi, Shandong, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang?.
China
China
Hong Kong native
Wu, Te-lin (2001) (p. 148)
Indonesia
Indonesia
Indonesia (Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Java
Japan
Japan
Japan (country) native
Wagner, Warren L./Herbst, Derral R./Sohmer, S. H. (1999) (p. 679)
North Korea
North Korea
North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
South Korea
South Korea
South Korea (Republic of) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Malaysia
Malaysia
Malaysia (country of) native
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Taiwan
Taiwan Island
Taiwan Island native
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
Mountain slopes, roadsides; below 2500 m.
Vietnam
Vietnam
Vietnam (Socialist Republic of) native
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Canada (except British Colombia)
Canada
Canada (country) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
Ontario
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
USA (Florida) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)

Control: 

Physical:  "The best control of L. cuneata combines both mechanical and chemical treatments. Hand pulling is impractical due to its extensive perennial root system, but mowing plants at the flower bud stage for two to three consecutive years can significantly reduce the vigor of stands as well as control further spread. Mowing followed by a herbicide treatment is likely the most effective option for the successful control of L. cuneata.  Prescribed burning, by itself, does not control populations of L. cuneata. Spring burns actually stimulate resprouting and encourage seed germination. Even so, prescribed burns applied late in the season and in combination with other control methods can help control L. cuneata. Late season burns decrease mature L. cuneata vigor, remove that year's seeds, and decrease seedling survival. Following a late season burn, herbicide can be applied, then mowed for good control results"  (Bugwood Wiki).

Chemical:  "Most current management procedures require the use of herbicides to control the growth and expansion of L. cuneata. Metsulfuron methyl (Escort®), triclopyr (Garlon®), clopyralid (Transline®) and glyphosate (RoundUp®) are some herbicides that are known to control L. cuneata. Herbicide should be applied to L. cuneata in early to midsummer, during the flower bud stage. A 2% triclopyr solution or a 0.5% clopyralid solution is effective in controlling L. cuneata during the vegetative stage prior to branching or during flowering. In wet sites, a 2% solution of an aquatic-approved glyphosate formulation (Rodeo®, Aquamaster®) is effective from early summer until seed set (Remaley 1998)"  (Bugwood Wiki).


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

  [   PIER species lists  ]   [   PIER home  ]

This page was created on 10 FEB 2005 and was last updated on 25 JUN 2009.