Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Genista monspessulana
(L.)L.A.S.Johnson, Fabaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Other Latin names:  Cytisus monspessulanus L.; Teline monspessulana (L.) K. Koch

Common name(s): [more details]

English: Canary broom, Cape broom, French broom, Montpellier broom, soft broom

Spanish: teline

Habit:  shrub

Description:  "Much-branched, usually evergreen shrub up to 2.5 m high; twigs villous, particularly when young, round and ribbed. Leaves usually sparsely to densely clothed in appressed hairs on both surfaces, sometimes subglabrous above, petiolate, 3-foliolate; leaflets shortly petiolulate, obovate, acute to obtuse and shortly mucronate, 7-20-(30) x (3)-4-10-(12) mm; terminal leaflet larger than lateral leaflets; stipules triangular to lanceolate, up to 2.5 mm long. Inflorescence a cluster, with axis < 10 mm long, of 4-7 flowers, terminating short lateral branches; pedicels c. 3 mm long. Calyx densely hairy, bilabiate; upper lip deeply 2-fid; lower lip shortly 3-lobed. Corolla yellow to golden yellow, 9-13 mm long; standard glabrous. Pod densely villous, oblong, 3-6-seeded, c. 18-20 mm long, 18-20 mm long; seeds green to black, ellipsoid or orbicular, flattened, c. 2.5 mm in diameter"  (Webb et al., 1988; 678).

Habitat/ecology:  "Grass- and heathland, sclerophyll forests, riparian habitats, rock outcrops, coastal areas.  In the native range, this shrub grows in scrub and in rocky places.  It forms extensive and dense thickets where invasive that displace native plant and forage species.  It is a fast-growing shrub that becomes reproductive within 2-3 years"  (Weber, 2003; p. 179).

In New Zealand, "waste places, scrubland"  (Webb et al., 1988; 678).

Propagation:  "Seeds are copiously produced and long-lived, and the soil seed bank may contain more than 6,000 seeds per square meter.  Seedlings are fairly shade tolerant.  The shrub easily resprouts from the root crown after damage"  (Weber, 2003; p. 179).

Native range:  "Mediterranean, Asia Minor, Azores"  (Webb et al., 1988; 678).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más a Tierra (Robinson Crusoe Island) introduced
invasive
Atkinson, Rachel/Sawyer, John (2011)
Under eradication.
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) introduced
invasive
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria
Naturalised
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales introduced
invasive
cultivated
National Herbarium of New South Wales (2013)
"Cultivated and widely naturalized".
Naturalised
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Chile (continental)
Chile
Chile (Republic of) introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Colombia
Colombia
Colombia (Republic of) introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Ecuador (Mainland)
Ecuador
Ecuador (Republic of) (continental) introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 678)
As Teline monspessulana (L.) K. Koch
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Oregon) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Washington) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)

Control: 

Physical:  "Manual control methods include hand pulling of seedlings and young plants and removing larger individuals with a weed wrench.  Cutting at or below ground of shrubs after seed set, and mowing the following summer to kill seedlings is another method.  It needs to be repeated over several years to deplete the soil seed bank"

Chemical:  "Chemical control is done by foliar spraying of glyphosate, 2,4-D, or picloram plus triclopyr applied to plants in full leaf"  (Weber, 2003; p. 179).


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 17 DEC 2010 and was last updated on 17 AUG 2011.