Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Cupaniopsis anacardioides
(A.Rich.) Radlk., Sapindaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Risk assessment results: 

High risk, score: 9 (Go to the risk assessment (Pacific))
Reject (based on second screen), score: 3 (Go to the risk assessment (U.S. (Florida)))

Other Latin names:  Cupania anacardioides A. Rich.

Common name(s): [more details]

English: beach-tamarind, carrotwood, cashew-leaf cupania, green-leaf-tamarind, tuckeroo

Habit:  tree

Description:  "Small tree, young parts, petioles, petiolules, peduncles pubescent. Petioles 3-7 cm long; leaflets 5-11; petiolules 2-7 mm long; leaflet blades elliptic, obovate or oblong, apex broad, retuse, base cuneate, margin entire, 5.5-19 cm X 2.5-6.5 cm, shining, glabrous above, pale, glabrous or puberulent below, lateral nerves spreading, parallel. Panicles 8-25 cm long, pedicels up to 2.5 mm long; outer calyx lobes 2.5 mm long, inner 3-4 mm long, puberulent; petals 1.5-3 mm long; stamens 8. Capsules yellow, subglobose, 3-furrowed and 3-ribbed, apiculate, 1.5 cm X 1.5 cm, shortly stipitate, valves thick, wrinkled and puberulent outside, densely rusty tomentose inside; seeds almost enclosed by red-orange aril" (Stanley and Ross, 1983; vol. 1, p. 512).

Habitat/ecology:  "Mangrove forests, cypress swamps, tropical hammocks, coastal dunes and forests.  Native habitats include coastal areas, lowland to upland rain forests, woodland and riverine forests.  The tree is fast growing, salt-tolerant, grows in full sun and shade, and is adapted to poor soils.  Where invasive, it forms dense thickets that crowd out native vegetation.  Seedlings and saplings can reach high densities and alter the understorey habitat"  (Weber, 2003; p. 129).

In its native range (Australia), widespread in depauperate rainforests, on creek banks and on coastal dunes (Stanley and Ross, 1983; vol. 1, p. 512). Salt-tolerant. In the US (Florida), invades both disturbed and undisturbed areas and forms dense thickets, crowding out native vegetation (Randall et al., 1996; p. 31).

Propagation:  Seed, spread by birds.

Native range:  Australia, New Guinea (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands introduced
cultivated
Staples, George W./Herbst, Derral/Imada, Clyde T. (2000) (p. 29)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Maui Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Starr, Forest/Starr, Kim (2011) (p. 32)
East Maui. Voucher cited: Starr & Starr 090819-01 (BISH)
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
O‘ahu Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Frohlich, Danielle/Lau, Alex (2010) (pp. 15-16)
Voucher cited: D. Frohlich & A. Lau 2008020801 (BISH)
Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island)
Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea Island) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Western Australia
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Australia
Australia (continental)
Northern Territory native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Indonesia
Indonesia
West Papua Province (Indonesia) (western New Guinea Island) (formerly Irian Jaya) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
USA (Florida) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)

Comments:  Planting of this species is prohibited in Miami-Dade County, Florida (U.S.) (Hunsberger, 2001).

Control: 

Physical: Hand-pull seedlings.

Chemical: Basal bark application of a triclopyr herbicide mixed with an oil diluent works well (Randall et al., 1996; p. 31).  Cut trees and treat the cut stumps with glyphosate or triclopyr (Weber, 2003; p. 129).


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This page was created on 1 JAN 1999 and was last updated on 17 MAR 2013.