Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Acacia longifolia
(Andrews) Willd., Fabaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  no

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Risk assessment results:  High risk, score: 10 (Go to the risk assessment)

Other Latin names:  Acacia sophorae (Labill.) R. Br.; Mimosa longifolia Andrews; Mimosa sophorae Labill.

Common name(s): [more details]

English: coastal wattle, golden wattle, long-leaved wattle, sallow wattle, Sydney golden wattle

Habit:  tree

Description:  "Shrub, small tree 3-7 m, unarmed.  Stems:  twig angled, glabrous or minutely hairy when young.  Leaf simple, 5-15 cm, linear-lanceolate or obovate; 2-3 longitudinal veins more prominent than others.  Inflorescence: spike 2-4 cm, axillary, less than leaf.  Flowers bright yellow.  Fruit 5-10 cm, more or less straight, more or less cylindric, narrowed between seeds, ending in a curved beak, brown.  Seed: stalk short, aril thick, cup-shaped"  (Hickman, 1993).

"A spreading and unarmed shrub or small tree, 2-10 m tall, with a smooth and grey bark, and with bright green, flat phyllodes instead of leaves.  Phyllodes are linear-lanceolate to obovate, 8-20 cm long and 1-2.5 cm wide, and have 2-5 prominent longitudinal veins.  Bright yellow flowers appear in axillary, cylindrical flowerheads of 2-5 cm length and c. 7 mm width.  Fruits are pale brown pods of 5-15 cm length and 3-6 mm width, more or less straight and cylindric, and constricted between seeds.  Each contains 6-8 seeds having a thick aril"  (Weber, 2003; p. 15).

Habitat/ecology:  "Disturbed places, especially sandy, coastal areas; up to 150 m" (Hickman, 1993). "Riparian habitats, woodland, grassland, coastal dunes and scrub"  (Weber, 2003; p. 15).

Propagation:  Seed. Large quantities of seed accumulate in the soil and may remain dormant for many years (Weber, 2003; p. 15).

Native range:  Eastern Australia

Presence:

Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria; naturalized, Western Australia
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales native
Australian Biological Resources Study (2013)
Australia
Australia (continental)
Queensland native
Australian Biological Resources Study (2013)
Colombia
Colombia
Colombia (Republic of) introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Indonesia
Indonesia
Indonesia (Republic of) introduced
cultivated
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Java
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
Owen, S. J. (1997)
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
cultivated
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 706)
"Waste land, scrubland, especially coastal areas".
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Indian Ocean
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
La Réunion (France)
La Réunion Island
La Réunion Island introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Mauritius
Mautitius Islands (Mauritius and Rodrigues)
Mauritius Island introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)

Comments:  Also reported invasive in South Africa (Henderson, 1995), Israel (Owen, 1997), Portugal (Hugo Bezerra, communications to Aliens listserver).

Control:  Pull or dig out small plants or treat with herbicide. Cut large trees since they do not sprout. Follow up to remove new seedlings (Weber, 2003; p. 15).


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 1 JAN 1999 and was last updated on 16 JAN 2011.