Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

  [   PIER species lists  ]   [   PIER home  ]

Acacia dealbata
Link, Fabaceae
Click on an image for links to BIGGER PICTURES


Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  no

Risk assessment results:  High risk, score: 22 (Go to the risk assessment)

Common name(s): [more details]

Chinese: yin jing

English: mimosa, silver wattle, Sydney black wattle

French: acacia bernier, acacia blanc, mimosa argenté, mimosa de Bormes

Spanish: acacia francesa, aromo, aromo de castilla, aromo del pais

Habit:  shrub/tree

Description:  "Shrub to large tree; twigs ribbed, densely puberulent. Leaves 2-pinnate, alternate, densely puberulent on rachis and sparsely hairy on pinnules; pinnae in (6)-10-21 pairs; pinnules in 25-40-(50) pairs, fairly close set, glaucous, narrow-oblong, obtuse or subacute, entire, 2-4-(7) x c. 0.75 mm; petiole (5)-10-20 mm long; stipules inconspicuous; solitary glands present between each pair of pinnae, usually except basal pair. Inflorescence of numerous, many-flowered, medium yellow, globose heads arranged in axillary, compound racemes ± = leaves. Flowers 5-merous, sessile. Pod glabrous, ± straight, 50-100 x 8-12 mm; aril scarcely folded, thickened to one side of seed.  Leaves of seedlings usually differ markedly from those of mature trees in being less glaucous, having fewer pinnae and fewer and larger pinnules. However, the distribution of glands and stem hairiness is the same as that of mature trees. Some flowering specimens have leaf forms similar to those of seedlings; again stem hairs and gland distribution distinguish these specimens"  (Webb et al., 1988; 705).

Description from Flora of Australia online.
Description from Flora of China online.

Habitat/ecology:  "Where native, this plant grows as a tall tree in mountain forests and along watercourses and in dry sclerophyll forests, remaining shrubby under dry conditions.  It forms dense thickets that suppress native vegetation, disrupt water flow and increase erosion along streambanks.  The plant is nitrogen-fixing and increases soil fertility"  (Weber, 2003; p. 14).

In New Zealand, "waste places, scrubland, riverbeds. In many areas silver wattle forms dense stands by suckering"  (Webb et al., 1988; 705).  "In Chile this species grows in the following environmental conditions:  Low altitude, interior valleys; coastal mountains, 500-2000 m; coastal areas, 0-500 m.  Somewhat dry areas where the drought may last 3-5 months, precipitations of 400-800 mm. are concentrated in winter; humid areas, with almost constant rainfall, short dry periods are possible (generally not longer than 1 month).  Fully exposed to the sun, level areas or slopes facing north; some shadow, some protection against direct sunlight, some shadow from vegetation, filtering about 20 - 40 % of light"  (Chileflora).

Propagation:  Seed

Native range:  Southeast Australia, Tasmania (Webb et al., 1988; 705).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia (Pacific offshore islands)
Norfolk Islands
Norfolk Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Australian Biological Resources Study (2013)
Voucher cited: R.O. Gardner 6186 (AK, K)
Cultivated as an ornamental and sometimes seeding itself
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más a Tierra (Robinson Crusoe Island) introduced
invasive
cultivated
Atkinson, Rachel/Sawyer, John (2011)
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más a Tierra (Robinson Crusoe Island) introduced
invasive
Danton, Philippe/Perrier, Christophe/Martinez Reyes, Guido (2006) (pp. 461, 465, 550)
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más Afuera (Alejandro Selkirk Island) introduced
invasive
Atkinson, Rachel/Sawyer, John (2011)
Chile (offshore islands)
Juan Fernández Islands
Isla Más Afuera (Alejandro Selkirk Island) introduced
invasive
Danton, Philippe/Perrier, Christophe/Martinez Reyes, Guido (2006) (pp. 461, 465, 550)
Voucher cited: Danton G(1474bis)1239bis
French Polynesia
Society Islands
Tahiti Island introduced
cultivated
Florence, J./Chevillotte, H./Ollier, C./Meyer, J.-Y. (2013)
Cultivée
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
Australia
Australia (continental)
Australia (continental) native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Australian Capital Territory, Tasmania, Victoria
Australia
Australia (continental)
New South Wales native
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Chile (continental)
Chile
Chile (Republic of) introduced
invasive
Belov, Michail (2013)
"This is an exotic plant, very invasive in central areas of Chile".
China
China
China (People's Republic of) introduced
cultivated
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
Fujian, Guangxi, Guizhou, Sichuan, Yunnan, Zhejiang
China
China
Hong Kong introduced
cultivated
Wu, Te-lin (2001) (pp. 129-130)
Costa Rica
Costa Rica
Costa Rica (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Guatemala
Guatemala
Guatemala (Republic of) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Naturalized
Japan
Japan
Japan (country) introduced
Mito, Toshikazu/Uesugi, Tetsuro (2004) (p. 184)
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 705)
Taiwan
Taiwan Island
Taiwan Island introduced
cultivated
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (Oregon) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
United States (west coast)
United States (west coast states)
USA (California) introduced
invasive
U.S. Dept. Agr., Agr. Res. Serv. (2013)
Indian Ocean
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
La Réunion (France)
La Réunion Island
La Réunion Island introduced
invasive
cultivated
Comité français de l'Union Internationale pour la Conservation de la Nature en France (2013)
foresterie, envahissant
Mauritius
Mautitius Islands (Mauritius and Rodrigues)
Mauritius Island introduced
ILDIS Co-ordinating Centre (2013)

Control:  "Mechanical control is achieved by ringbarking or digging out, chemical control by basal stem treatments, stump treatments, or foliar spray with herbicides.  After clearing large infestations, a follow-up programme is necessary to remove emerging seedlings and to prevent coppice regrowth.  Stumps need to be treated with herbicides in order to prevent resprouting, and it is recommended to keep stumps lower than 15 cm"  (Weber, 2003; p. 14).


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

  [   PIER species lists  ]   [   PIER home  ]

This page was created on 15 DEC 2010 and was last updated on 19 FEB 2013.